Becoming: Boldly Meek

Sometimes it is the simple things that teach us our greatest lessons. Yesterday you may recall I asked if  you ever just get a word stuck in your head?

A word that seems to just pop in there, from out of nowhere and then won’t leave you alone?

If it has happened to you, then you can empathise with the feeling that it can be quite maddening. Bouncing around the left brain, right brain, tip of tongue… 

Why am I stuck on this word?

When was the last time I even heard that word? 

How could this possibly have anything to do with anything?

The word I could not let go of is forbearance.

Hmm…defined as patience… endurance… tolerance… I just used all three of those skills in searching for my answer. There must be something to this forbearance thing and how it relates to our shared path of “Becoming”.

The image inserted here of a woman pausing along a forest path is a Photo by Vanessa Garcia on Pexels.com

Self-control, restraint, tolerance they all come easier when we are able to move beyond anger and be more patient. 

Forbearance encompasses many parts of our “Becoming”. Patience. Trust. Faith. Humility. Meekness. 

Wait!

Yes it has happened again….

Another word is stuck. So today we’ll examine meekness and why being meek is the new bold.

A graphic showing the definition of meekness is inserted here by Rochelle Jeanette

Too ofen the world uses meek focusing on being submissive and equating that to being weak. However that couldn’t be further from the Truth. Yes Truth – with a capital “T”. 

In the Scriptures we learn about the strengths of being meek, and the rewards we can be expectant of for our obedience. 

In Matthew 5:5, you can read, “Blessed are the meek for they will inherit the earth”.

Taken from Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, this verse is one of the Beatitudes. Simply defined beatitude as an extreme form of happiness. “The noun beatitude refers to a state of great joy. Being blessed, or at least feeling blessed, is often linked to beatitude.”

Beatitude comes to us from the Latin word beatus, defined as being both “happy” and “blessed.” In the Bible, the Beatitudes are a series of eight blessings.” Some sources indicate that in  he late 1950’s writer Jack Kerouac came up with the nickname “The Beat Generation” because he felt its members, referred to as “Beatniks”  were individuals seeking beatitude.

A photo of a vintage figurine called The Beatnik, a hep cat playing drums, from the personal collection of Rochelle Jeanette is pictured here.

Jesus used the term meekness in the Beatitudes, as a description of those who were blessed, not those who were timid, weak or push overs. His use of the word was in line with the term-gentleness, and used as an impetus for trusting God to win the battle instead of taking extremes into our own hands to attempt to win on our own terms. 

The concept of being meek is often described as “strength under control”. 

Having the ability to temper our emotions, remain patient, steadfast in our faith and trust. Now that’s extremely bold behavior given some of the tests we face on a daily basis. 

That’s why I’m willing to declare that Meek is the new Bold.

Bold does not have to be loud, obnoxious or in their face. Bold can be realized, renewed, revitalized as being an active proponent of right. “Becoming” one who is willing to firmly stand their ground, with resolve, empowering the courage of conviction as our strength, supported by faithfulness and trust. 

It is no coincidence, ( since by now you may realize I do not believe there is such a thing as coincidence ), that forbearance is part of the definition of meekness. With emotions in check we can move forward and upward on our shared paths to “Becoming”.. By understanding that patient self-control, restraint and tolerance  all work together to strengthen our renewals, embolden our resolve for all to experience revival in our lives. 

Front Closure Butterfly Embroidery Back Wireless Push Up Bra

As I mentioned earlier being bold is not a synonym for being loud or trying to out shout someone else. Having bold convictions is a deep meekness of spirit. Having strong convictions based upon what some might term our softer sides. These include Love, Faith, Belief, Trust, Obedience and Charity.

Being meek, quiet, gentle, patient, long-suffering, forbearing, resigned,reverent, peaceful, peaceable, docile, mild, demure, modest, humble, unassuming, and unpretentious certainly takes courage. It involves having faith in ourselves to live in accord with the Lord. To trust Him and remain relentless in our purpose of always “Becoming”. 

Throughout time the boldest of all have been those who have had the strength to embrace their beliefs. Stand for their convictions with steadfastness, long suffering and patience. Those who have the conviction to be obedient to the attitudes of love, charity and peace. And are willing to not only accept but also be giving of these things at all times. 

Now we see a photo of MLK showing Embracing The Opportunities Of Becoming.

Meek does not equal weak. Meekness is the new bold because it is being powerful without taking  aggression. It is a requirement of being able to achieve spiritual success. 

So when is the proper time to embolden your meekness?

How about, right,…. Now!

There is no time like the present. In fact the present moment is the only one we can attempt to influence. The past is done. Tomorrow is not promised. To live a life of “Becoming Today”, your positive actions are required right here, right now. 

I encourage you to resolve to boldly go forth, meek in character and become all you are intended to be.

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